Sunday, September 11, 2011

The Sync Whole

infinity in reflection . . .
(the tip in the pit)

The alchemist picked up a book that someone in the caravan had brought. Leafing through the pages, he found a story about Narcissus.

The alchemist knew the legend of Narcissus, a youth who knelt daily beside a lake to contemplate his own beauty. He was so fascinated by himself that, one morning, he fell into the lake and drowned. At the spot where he fell, a flower was born, which was called the narcissus.

But this was not how the author of the book ended the story.

He said that when Narcissus died, the goddesses of the forest appeared and found the lake, which had been fresh water, transformed into a lake of salty tears.

"Why do you weep?" the goddesses asked.

"I weep for Narcissus," the lake replied.

"Ah, it is no surprise that you weep for Narcissus," they said, "for though we always pursued him in the forest, you alone could contemplate his beauty close at hand."

"But... was Narcissus beautiful?" the lake asked.

"Who better than you to know that?" the goddesses said in wonder. "After all, it was by your banks that he knelt each day to contemplate himself!"

The lake was silent for some time. Finally, it said:

"I weep for Narcissus, but I never noticed that Narcissus was beautiful. I weep because, each time he knelt beside my banks, I could see, in the depths of his eyes, my own beauty reflected."

"What a lovely story," the alchemist thought.

~The Alchemist Paulo Coelho

. . .


So he who hath the whole authority o’er [all] the mortals in the cosmos and o’er its lives irrational, bent his face downwards through the Harmony, breaking right through its strength, and showed to downward Nature God’s fair Form.

And when she saw that Form of beauty which can never satiate, and him who [now] possessed within himself each single energy of [all seven] Rulers as well as God’s [own] Form, she smiled with love; for ’twas as though she’d seen the image of Man’s fairest form upon her Water, his shadow on her Earth.

He in his turn beholding the form like to himself, existing in her, in her Water, loved it and willed to live in it; and with the will came act, and [so] he vivified the form devoid of reason.

And Nature took the object of her love and wound herself completely round him, and they were intermingled, for they were lovers. (Poemandres)





I'll just tell you about this madman stuff that happened to me around last Christmas just before I got pretty run-down and had to come out here and take it easy. I mean that's all I told D.B. about, and he's my brother and all. He's in Hollywood. That isn't too far from this crumby place, and he comes over and visits me practically every week end. He's going to drive me home when I go home next month maybe. He just got a Jaguar. One of those lithe English jobs that can do around two hundred miles an hour. It cost him damn near four thousand bucks. He's got a lot of dough, now. He didn't use to. He used to be just a regular writer, when he was home. He wrote this terrific book of short stories, The Secret Goldfish, in case you never heard of him. The best one in it was "The Secret Goldfish." It was about this little kid that wouldn't let anybody look at his goldfish because he'd bought it with his own money. It killed me. (The Catcher in the Rye)



... Now, in spite of the snow-dazzle, he thought he could see something there. Something moving. A hand. The waving hand of some desperately unhappy child, waving hand, pleading hand, drowning hand.

(Save me O please save me. If you can't save me at least come play with me... forever, and forever, and forever.) (The Shining, chapter 34, page 197)


"Reflecting Absence"



"Sleeping lies the murdered lass, vainly cries the child of glass. When the two shall be as one, the spirit's journey will be done."

Another Tom riddle

Ham. Where wilt thou lead me? speak; Ile go no further.
Gho. Marke me.
Ham. I will.
Gho. My hower is almost come,
When I to sulphurous and tormenting Flames
Must render vp my selfe.

("Yer a wizard, Danny")

Ham. Alas poore Ghost.
Gho. Pitty me not, but lend thy serious hearing
To what I shall vnfold.
Ham. Speake, I am bound to heare.
Gho. So art thou to reuenge, when thou shalt heare.


Helen of Troy






("The room where everything is hidden")




Room 237 At Beyond The Infinite Hotel 


. . .

9 comments:

  1. Eerie. I've been living in Room 237 for the past 5 years. Literally. It's the street address of my house. I've been trying to move for months, but it won't let me leave. So, I've slowly figured out that 237 is the end of my journey.

    Just like it's the end of DB's journey in your totally awesome comparison of Room 237 to the hotel room from 2001: A Space Odyssey. The similarities of the setup and camera angles are truly uncanny.

    Doc: "It's like I go to sleep and he shows me things. But when I wake up I can't remember everything."

    That quote above from The Shining video clip...it's exactly the same way I've described my "knowing" to many people.

    Oh, if only I had heard Dick Hallorann's warning before I fell down this rabbit hole!

    At least I'm not the only one Shining. You guys are on the receiving end of the Sync download stream, too.

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  2. incredible Eleleth,
    you've outdone yourself . . .

    ReplyDelete
  3. Wendy is reading *Catch[h]er in the [w]rye* isn't she?
    I would only know that because of the color of the book.

    wry |rī|
    adjective ( wryer , wryest or wrier, wriest)
    1 using or expressing dry, esp. mocking, humor : a wry smile | wry comments.
    2 (of a person's face or features) twisted into an expression of disgust, disappointment, or annoyance.
    • archaic (of the neck or features) distorted or turned to one side : a remedy for wry necks.

    ORIGIN early 16th cent. (in the sense [contorted] ): from Old English wrīgian [tend, incline,] in Middle English [deviate, swerve, contort.]

    http://themaskofgod.blogspot.com/2011/02/thats-some-catch-that-catch-22.html

    ReplyDelete
  4. Well, of course the Atlantean Sibyl would live in room 237.

    All credit goes to this guy.

    And yes, it's Catcher, of course.

    In a film so replete with Shining references, we should not be surprised that the Triwizard Cup = Room 237.

    Note that it is revealed in the seventh book that the death of his sister Ariana was what Albus remembered when he drank the draught of bitterness.

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  5. @Eleleth...I just hope I'm not that haggy old lady LOL

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  6. @Eleleth...in the movie "House of Yes", Jackie-O's most recent mental breakdown was triggered because her seltzer water didn't have any BUBBLES in it.

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  7. Bubbles? Clearly the lack of pneuma was what caused the neglected subconscious to revenge herself against the conscious mind ... classic story, really.

    (And once again, the last additions to this post, and the ones that tie everything together, should've been the first.)

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  8. this post was inspired by the image on the NYT 911 Reckoning supplement last Sunday [the 11th]. The image makes the new ground zero fountain[s] look like both the Kaaba and the well of souls. It takes up the whole page and is such an enigmatic photo--I wish I could show it to you, but I haven't been able to locate it's digital double "out there".

    (I found these 76 images today looking for this photo in question. I really hadn't been present with the towers for a while now, even with the anniversary. I really bonded with these things--after-the-fact. How many years were they at the center of my seeking? [I started waking up late 2005, and really began questioning in earnest 2006]
    I have spent so much time at a place that I have never been.
    you've done so much for me.
    thank you.

    ReplyDelete

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